Sashiko Cloth, Sasa-Rin-Dou

$20.49 CAD

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This traditional sashiko design is printed on navy blue 100% cotton fabric with wash away markings.  You just thread your sashiko needle with sashiko thread and enjoy the stitching. 

Sashiko threads comes in many colours, choose your favourite, or use traditional white. This fabric is easy to stitch, any of the sashiko threads or needles on this website are suitable. 

How to: There are 8 or so similar designs you can choose from in this series for QH Textiles.  Basic instructions are included but if you are new to sashiko stitching this blog has more details and photographs you may find helpful.

Remember the markings will wash out so don't get the fabric damp before you have finished stitching. Also, please don't iron it! You may not be able to wash out the markings if you do. (You can iron it after it is stitched and washed)

The sashiko printed design is 12" x 12" but the fabric provided is 13" x 26".  For a nicer and more traditional sashiko piece, fold the unprinted fabric to the back of the printed fabric and do the stitching through both layers. 

Uses & Care: This cloth sampler is called a Hana Fukin, which means a 'useful household cloth'. You can use these in the kitchen to cover a bowl of fruit, eggs, or breads, or as table mats, or as absorbent tea towels. You can also use them to make cushions, or stitch several together to make a runner.  They also make excellent quilt blocks combines with other cotton dyed yarn or Japanese print fabrics.

Sashiko stitching is durable and machine washable. This fabric and thread will become prettier with repeat washing as they both thicken and the thread plumps up a little. Remember to leave a bit of ease in your stitching to allow for this. If you unfamiliar with why, read this blog :-)  I dry mine on low heat in the dryer, remove before it is entirely dry, and press. 

 Symbolism: In the Heian era (794-1185) the rindou (gentian) flower was a popular decoration on the clothing of nobles. The plant is referred to in a famous 8th century poem as "pensive grass'' because in the fall its purple petals hand downward resembling a person in deep thought.

At some point the rindou symbol cam the be the kamon of the families of the Minamoto clan, also known as the Genji clan.