Re-visiting Simple Embroidery + Stitching Kid's Drawings

by Susan Fletcher

hand embroidered child's drawing
This summer I have the joy of grandchildren around the house. Aside from just making me happy, their drawings have inspired me to revisit simple embroidery! 
 
I found this drawing in my grandson's kindergarten writing book and turned it into a cushion for his mom and dad. 
Below is how to do the same:
embroidered cushion
First you have to ask if you can use the drawing. Turns out even a 6 year old knows that their art work actually belongs to them! Who knew? And also, I thought if I made the embroidery it belonged to me, but apparently I only own a sort of shared ownership with the artist!  :-D 
transfer drawing by tracing it onto regular copy paper
Trace the drawing onto regular copy paper. You may need to simplify, or enlarge.  
trace stitching design onto fabric
In this case, I am using a design transfer paper (sometimes called dressmakers carbon) to transfer the design onto your fabric. To do this lay the colored side of the transfer paper face down on your fabric. Use a rounded tip pen (ball point) and trace over the design pressing quite firmly. Check at the beginning of your tracing to be sure the transfer is clear on the fabric.
place drawing in embroidery hoop
After I remove the tracing paper, I like to trace over the design again with an iron away fabric pen so that I know the design won't rub away to much from handling as I stitch.
embroider the drawing
Stitch. I use a simple running stitch. I like to choose colors to match the original when I can, but the green face was too much for me :-D
embroidered stitched drawing
I stitched this drawing using 3 strand embroidery thread, but if the drawing had been any smaller I might have used two strands. Basically I pick my thread and it's thickness based on what I think will work given the design I'm stitching. There are NO RULES  :-D  You don't have to "color inside the lines"
finished stitched drawing
Remember to put the year and the child's name on the embroidery - which I didn't - drat damn!  Here is the finished cushion. I used dyed yarn fabrics to make a simple strip border edge until the cushion was the size of the cushion form I had.  
finished hand stitched cushion
Happy August stitching!
Talk to you again,
Susan

Susan Fletcher
Susan Fletcher

Author

Owner A threaded Needle


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